50 Classroom Job Ideas

50 Classroom Job Ideas

Do you use jobs in your classroom? Class jobs can teach students responsibility and help them feel invested in the classroom. It also takes work off your plate! However, deciding what classroom jobs to have can be tricky.

To narrow it down, think through your ideal day of school. What tasks will need to be done? What are your responsibilities? Which of these can be passed to the kids? What will need to be cleaned, straightened, distributed, switched out, monitored, or led? Start a list of the tasks your students can help you with. Then look at the list below and see if you missed anything.

  1. line leader
  2. door holder
  3. caboose
  4. technician
  5. teacher helper
  6. cubby keeper/mailman
  7. paper passers
  8. lunch basket helpers
  9. lunch counter
  10. voice monitor
  11. hall monitor
  12. attendance checker
  13. materials managers
  14. assignment checkers
  15. photographer
  16. paper collector
  17. whiteboard cleaner
  18. calendar changer
  19. equipment manager
  20. energy monitor
  21. computer checker
  22. student experts
  23. cleanup crew
  24. trash duty
  25. pencil sharpener
  26. desk inspector
  27. point keeper
  28. pet feeder
  29. cage cleaner
  30. messenger
  31. lunch count
  32. absent folder filler
  33. snack passer
  34. current events
  35. morning meeting leader
  36. counter/table wipers
  37. pledge leader
  38. substitute
  39. center checker
  40. peer mediator
  41. playground friend
  42. center changer
  43. note keeper/secretary
  44. job changer
  45. class DJ
  46. bulletin board curator
  47. student nurse
  48. student researcher
  49. classroom maintenance
  50. brain break/brain dance leader

Of course this is not an exhaustive list, but it should give you a good place to start! The most important thing about choosing classroom jobs is to make them work for YOU and your management style. What jobs would you add to this list? Comment below and let me know!

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